Highlights

Feelings of Loneliness Increase 181% As A Result of Social Distancing and Shelter-In-Place During COVID-19

SAN JOSE, Calif., -- Women's Health Interactive released the results of an independent and anonymous online survey of 1,043 respondents conducted to explore the ways that social distancing and shelter-in-place orders during COVID-19 affected feelings of loneliness.

The 'Women's Health Interactive COVID-19 Loneliness Survey' results provide insight into loneliness before the pandemic and how the depth and scope of loneliness changed during the pandemic.

Survey Highlights:
Loneliness nearly tripled (+181%): 20.7% of all respondents reported struggling with feelings of loneliness before social distancing and shelter-in-place orders; 58.1% reported feeling somewhat or much lonelier during

Women's loneliness higher, increased more than men: 18.4% of women reported struggling with feelings of loneliness prior; 60.6% (+228%) reported feeling somewhat or much lonelier during. 22.4% of men reported struggling with feelings of loneliness prior; 55% (+146%) reported feeling somewhat or much lonelier during

Millennials loneliest overall, Boomers least; But, Boomers/Gen X saw biggest increase in loneliness: 15.7% of Baby Boomers, 16.6% of Generation X, and 24.3% of Millennials reported struggling with feelings of loneliness prior; 50.8% (+224%) of Baby Boomers, 53.6% (+222%) of Generation X, and 61.8% (+154%) of Millennials reported feeling somewhat or much lonelier during

Loneliness increased the most for those who live with children; those who live alone remained the loneliest overall: 16.7% of people who live with children reported struggling with feelings of loneliness prior; 55% (+229%) reported feeling somewhat or much lonelier during. 28.9% of people who live alone (19.3% who live with others, no children) reported struggling with feelings of loneliness prior; 67.7% (+134%) of people who live alone (54.7% (+183%) who live with others, no children) reported feeling somewhat or much lonelier during

Remote contact easing Baby Boomers' loneliness more than other generations: 47% of Baby Boomers reported that remote contact (Zoom, FaceTime, etc.) helped alleviate loneliness during, compared to 37.8% of Generation X and 42.5% of Millennial respondents. 10.8% of Baby Boomers, 14.9% of Generation X and 21.1% of Millennials reported that remote contact made feelings of loneliness WORSE

Top activities people report missing out on the most (respondents chose up to 3): Being with friends and family (59.5%); Dining out (47.2%); Traveling or going on vacation (26.6%); Going to work (26.4%); Going to entertainment venues (24.4%); Working out at a gym or fitness class (23.9%); Attending church (15.3%); Social hobby (12.6%)